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Looking Back, Looking Forward

Somehow it’s almost the end of 2014! We OneFours have had such an incredible year, and we’ve been so glad to share our experiences with all of you. As we make our final farewells as debut authors, we want to share…

A fun/unexpected/meaningful moment/experience of your debut year:

My mother’s enthusiasm. She is a one woman sales-excitement machine, sharing with all of her friends from everywhere and forever about “my daughter’s book.” It’s pretty much the sweetest thing ever.–Jaye Robin Brown, NO PLACE TO FALL

All the amazing people who’ve come into my life and who I can now call friends. Definitely an unexpected and meaningful perk during this debut year.–Robin Constantine, THE PROMISE OF AMAZING

I had two show steers at my launch party, and just as the first was brought up to “show,” he pooped. Which is how STEERING TOWARD NORMAL opens. Nature gave me a perfect book birthday gift!–Rebecca Petruck, STEERING TOWARD NORMAL

A twelve-year-old girl came up to me at Vegas Valley Book Festival with her copy of CAMELOT BURNING, which she’d just bought, and asked me to sign it for her as she went on about how much she loves BBC’s MERLIN. We fangirled together for about five minutes. It was AWESOME.–Kathryn Rose, CAMELOT BURNING

Definitely the letters I’ve received from readers has been the best thing ever. Even now, thinking that I wrote something that might help someone through a hard time, makes me tear up.–Helene Dunbar, THESE GENTLE WOUNDS

The support has been so amazing: from friends, family, acquaintances, old high school friends, random strangers, and of course, all of the wonderful writers I’ve met this year. I expected this to be a more solitary journey than it has been, and that’s been an incredible surprise.–AdriAnne Strickland, WORDLESS

The best moments of being an author aren’t when you’re at a conference or on a panel. They’re when you check your PO box or author email account to find a message from a young reader who connected with your book. Being able to share our words and stories with readers is a gift and an honor–and it makes everything else in this crazy career worthwhile.–Rebecca Behrens, WHEN AUDREY MET ALICE

Standing behind the podium at Powell’s and talking about my very own book was the first time I felt even a little bit like a real author. It was a wonderful feeling.–Heidi Schulz, HOOK’S REVENGE

I loved getting to be a part of the Boston Teen Author Festival this year. I’ve gone to a bunch of events like these, but being on panels with authors I admired was mind-boggling.–Annie Cardi, THE CHANCE YOU WON’T RETURN

After co-writing DREAM BOY with my friend Madelyn Rosenberg, I thought we were about as close as we possibly could be. As she helped shepherd me through my first year as a published novelist, however, new aspects of our relationship came to light and we grew even closer. Without a doubt, getting to know her different sides has been the best part of a wonderful debut year.–Mary Crockett, DREAM BOY

One of my best memories of this year: I walked into a classroom on one my first school visits and a boy ran up to me yelling, “This book is AWESOME!” Meeting readers and inspiring young writers has been so rewarding.–Louise Galveston, BY THE GRACE OF GOD

My favorite debut moment was seeing my book in a store for the first time. It was early, so I wasn’t in “published author” mode yet, and it was just so impossible to internalize. So I made myself stare at it until it penetrated that I had done this, and then I cried like a baby on the floor of B&N.–Dahlia Adler, BEHIND THE SCENES

One of my favorite memories this year was at a library event. A student walked into the room and after seeing my Gilded and Silvern banners, he raced across the room saying, “That is my favorite book! And look, there’s a sequel!”–Christy Farley, GILDED

One of my favorite moments of this year was after a school event. Several of the students wrote me letters to tell me that, after hearing me talk about how my multiple failures led to my success in publishing, they had made the jump and tried the things that scared them. One tried out for the basketball team (and made it). One decided to write the story she’d always wanted to write (even though people told her she wasn’t good enough). I will cherish these letters forever!–Veronica Bartles, TWELVE STEPS

I didn’t think debut day would be surprising. I mean, I had approximately 2 years to prepare for it, but the morning my book official came out, my social media streams, cell phone, and email all drowned in love and support from my community. It was shocking. And amazing. And I’ll remember that feeling of being buoyed up for years to come.–Natalie C. Parker, BEWARE THE WILD

There are so many great moments in this debut year, but the best is probably the solid wall of support and love — from new friends in the writing community, from family who has watched me pursue this for years, from readers who discover and love the book — that I’ve found to lean against through the ups and downs.–Dana Alison Levy, THE MISADVENTURES OF THE FAMILY FLETCHER

There have been a lot of these moments, but standing in front of a group of students while they asked me questions about my book – that was one of the best. Reading meant so much to me when I was in high school. It was extremely humbling to know that students were reading and enjoying something I had written.–Emily Lloyd-Jones, ILLUSIVE

Unexpected: all of the support and love from the small town I grew up in!–Kate Boorman, WINTERKILL

Unexpected: how emotional it would be to see my book on a bookstore shelf. I knew it would be awesome but the feeling was overwhelming. I cried. Amazing.–Maria Andreu, THE SECRET SIDE OF EMPTY

I will never forget the first time a teen reader emailed me about how she’d read and enjoyed my book. I felt like dancing all day long (but I didn’t because I can’t dance so trust me, this was a good thing for the sake of my family).–Lori M. Lee, GATES OF THREAD AND STONE

And a piece of advice for future debut writers:

My advice to future debuts is not to sweat the small stuff – so many things aren’t nearly as important as they seem. No one is gonna boycott your book because the cover was revealed early on Goodreads. No one needs you to be a blogger on top of being an author. Just do what you love, be kind, and write good books.–Dahlia Adler, BEHIND THE SCENES

Connect with other writers as much as possible. Writing can be solitary and publishing even more so, having others around you who “get it” can make the insanity of the publishing process so much easier.–Helene Dunbar, THESE GENTLE WOUNDS

Celebrate EVERY milestone! Even if it’s something as simple as, “I totally finished editing that crazy impossible chapter, and now it shines,” acknowledge it and celebrate!–Kathryn Rose, CAMELOT BURNING

Reach out. Don’t feel like you have to go it alone. Have a stupid question? Ask it! Probably everyone else is wondering the same thing — and somebody out there might even have some answers to share!–Mary Crockett, DREAM BOY

To all soon-to-be published writers, my only advice is to ground yourself. Ground yourself with friends, family, ideals that you hold close, and memories of why you wanted this in the first place. Because this is a wild ride and it’s easy to lose yourself to it. But as long as you have a great support system, you’ll be fine.—-Emily Lloyd-Jones, ILLUSIVE

Breathe. A lot. And when things get really crazy, it helps to remember why you started in the first place. It all comes back to the writing!–Robin Constantine, THE PROMISE OF AMAZING

Writing is one thing. Publishing is another thing. Keep writing! A lot of the publishing stuff is out of your control and trying to control it will make you crazy. But the writing is always there and completely yours.–Rebecca Petruck, STEERING TOWARD NORMAL

Remember how life is a thing that happens? Remember how you love doing things other than writing and figuring out how to promote yourself online and in person without feeling like you’ve transformed into a repeating sound-byte? Good. Now remember when you didn’t feel guilty about going to the movies or hanging with your friends? Good. Hold on to that because you deserve to enjoy life in addition to writing.–Natalie C. Parker, BEWARE THE WILD

Plan a launch party. Introvert me was horrified at the thought, but my special person pushed me into it and I’m so glad I did. It was simple (cupcakes, readings, music, at a book store) but people from every moment of my life showed up. It was this big ball of awe and gratitude and I won’t ever forget the support and love I felt that night.–Jaye Robin Brown, NO PLACE TO FALL

Remember to enjoy yourself! You’re following your dream, and yet it’s easy to get so caught up in the stress of it all that you forget the initial giddiness over the fact that you’re (going to be) published. Have fun with it!–AdriAnne Strickland, WORDLESS

Always bring a couple of author copies to a signing, in case you mess up when personalizing a book. It happens. (Also: bring postcards or another piece of signable swag for readers who can’t purchase a book!)–Rebecca Behrens, WHEN AUDREY MET ALICE

Pick and choose what you do for promotion. It’s tempting to do it all but in my debut year I discovered that my energy is finite. (Who knew?). Best thing I ever learned was to do events with other writers instead of doing them solo. A fraction of the work, a multiple of the fun.–Maria Andreu, THE SECRET SIDE OF EMPTY

The last few weeks leading up to your launch may leave you feeling like a quivery ball of tearful stress and anxiety. You may also feel guilty because publishing a book is a dream come true and why, oh why, aren’t you feeling happier about it??? EVERYTHING IS RUINED. All of this is perfectly normal. Feel whatever you feel and know that it will get better.–Heidi Schulz, HOOK’S REVENGE

Remember when reviews start rolling in that you have a small army of people, including industry pros, who think your writing rocks. Don’t let stars and rankings sideswipe your confidence or choke your creativity.–Louise Galveston, BY THE GRACE OF GOD

Never, never give up. If you keep going, even in the face of failure, good things will happen for you. It’s totally cliche, but it’s absolutely true. I can trace every single one of my most successful moments directly back to a moment where I’d failed so miserably it looked like giving up was the only option. But I kept going, and good things were always just around the corner.–Veronica Bartles, TWELVE STEPS

You don’t have to do this alone. Even if there isn’t an organized group of debuts like the OneFours, basically all debut authors (and authors in general) share the same fears and uncertainties. Find your people. We are here <3–Lori M. Lee, GATES OF THREAD AND STONE

The thing all newly published authors need to remember is that the story that was once theirs no longer exists. It is now a book, something that exists in the public domain, for anyone and everyone to read and discuss. Find a tribe of other writers to vent, cry, complain and talk to, because having your story out in the world can be a wild ride.–Dana Alison Levy, THE MISADVENTURES OF THE FAMILY FLETCHER

There’s no one way to be a writer. It’s easy to compare yourself to others whose books are getting starred reviews or flying off the shelves or getting awards, but we’re all on different journeys and connecting with different readers in different ways. Cheer for your fellow writers, but don’t forget to cheer for yourself, too.–Annie Cardi, THE CHANCE YOU WON’T RETURN

My advice for future debut writers is to focus on why you are writing. It’s because you love it. Don’t ever lose that love you have for writing.–Christy Farley, GILDED

Work hard, write from the heart, celebrate yourself and others, and smash those narratives of self-doubt and impostor syndrome with a GIANT SMASHY HAMMER.–Kate Boorman, WINTERKILL

Thanks so much to everyone who’s been a part of our 2014 debut experience! Here’s to even more adventures in 2015 and beyond!

Annie Cardi lives outside Boston, MA, where she spends her time baking, creating alternate lyrics for tv show theme songs, and writing YA fiction. Her debut novel, THE CHANCE YOU WON’T RETURN, is now available from Candlewick Press. Her writing is fueled by copious amounts of coffee and chocolate.
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Next Book News! This Month with Even More OneFour Book News!

IT’S A ONEFOUR SUMMER GOOD NEWS EXTRAVAGANZA! This month we’re combining the Next Book News with our updates about how our debuts are doing for a big ol’ festival of book goodness.

We’ve debuted, we’re debuting and we’re selling more stuff! Check back on the 28th of each month to find out all the awesome Next Book News!

excited-anna (1)

Skila Brown sold another book!

From the Publisher’s Marketplace announcement:
From the author of CAMINAR, Skila Brown’s WITH THE END IN SIGHT, told from a 19-year old’s point of view, one of the survivors from the ill-fated Donner party, about her family’s wagon train journey from Lacon, IL to the Sierra Nevada Mountains in 1846, to Liz Bicknell at Candlewick, by Tina Wexler at ICM (World English).

Skylar Dorset has an official title!

The sequel to THE GIRL WHO NEVER WAS has been titled THE BOY WITH THE HIDDEN NAME and will be released on December 2, 2014! (Yes, that’s six months from now!)

Erica Cameron has a sequel cover!

I now have a cover for the sequel to SING SWEET NIGHTINGALE! I present to you book 2 in The Dream War Saga, DEADLY SWEET LIES:

Nadette Lawson knows when you’re lying.

Every night for the past two years, the Balasura have visited her dreams, enticing her to enter their world. And every night she’s seen through their lies. Now, they’re tired of playing in the shadows and they begin to stalk her in the waking world. It’s no longer just an invitation; if Nadette doesn’t join them, they’ll take her family. Forever. She needs help, and the haven she’s seeking may be just out of reach.

Julian Teagan is a master of deception.

To survive, he has to convince the world his mother isn’t useless, that everything’s fine, otherwise he’ll lose what little he has left in this life. He knows the lying won’t be enough to keep him and his mother in the shadows, but it’s all he knows. The only light of truth is Orane, a Balasura who sees past Julian’s facade and challenges him to face the darkness.

Then Orane is killed, and Julian learns his mentor was far from innocent. The Balasura have hunted children like him for centuries, and their next target, Nadette is his one chance at finally being a part of something real. If Julian can just convince her to trust him…

See more information at thedreamwarsaga.com or byericacameron.com

Deadly Sweet Lies

More sequel news from Stephanie Diaz!

REBELLION, the sequel to EXTRACTION, will be released February 10, 2015.

Add it on Goodreads: www.goodreads.com/book/show/18625184-rebellion
Pre-order on Amazon: www.amazon.com/Rebellion-Stephanie-Diaz/dp/1250041252/ref=la_B00FI7SQ4M_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1402525743&sr=1-2

Jen Malone sold more books!

From PM:
Jen Malone’s YA debut WANDERLOST, in which a teen girl agrees to impersonate her older sister and fill in for her as a summer tour guide for a senior citizen bus trip through Europe; when their carefully constructed plan derails before she even makes it out of the airport and the tour owner’s cute son joins as a surprise guest, she’ll put her acting skills to the test, to Annie Berger at Harper Teen, in a two-book deal, by Holly Root at Waxman Leavell Literary Agency (World).

Rebecca Behrens sold another book!

From PW:
Jordan Hamessley at Egmont USA has bought North American rights to The Summer of Lost and Found, a middle-grade novel by Rebecca Behrens. In it, a girl’s father mysteriously disappears and her botanist mother drags her to Roanoke Island for a research trip, where she decides to solve the mystery of the Lost Colony. It will publish in spring 2016; Suzie Townsend at New Leaf Literary & Media brokered the deal.

Nicole Maggi has a cover!

HEARTLINES is a standalone thriller coming February 2015 from SourceBooks Fire.

An exciting new thriller from Nicole Maggi about a girl whose memories are slowly being taken over after a heart transplant from a murder victim.

Georgie Kendrick wakes up after a heart transplant, but the organ beating in her chest doesn’t seem to be in tune with the rest of her body. Why does she have a sudden urge for strawberries when she’s been allergic for years? Why can’t she remember last Christmas? Driven to find her donor, Georgie discovers her heart belonged to a girl her own age who fell out of the foster care system and into a rough life on the streets. Everyone thinks she committed suicide, but Georgie is compelled to find the truth—before she loses herself completely.

heartlines

 

 

IN DEBUT BOOK NEWS:

 

FOUR STARRED REVIEWS for OTHERBOUND by Corinne Duyvis! School Library Journal gave OTHERBOUND by Corinne Duyvis its third starred review! “While Duyvis’s debut is an exciting take on the fantasy genre, as it alternates between our world and that of the Dunelands, the true strength of the novel is in its positive portrayal of LGBT issues. This becomes most important in establishing the character of Nolan, an adolescent who has experienced most of his adolescence from the perspective of a girl, and in the nuanced portrayal of Amara’s relationships.” In its FOURTH STARRED REVIEW, The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books praises OTHERBOUND’s “subtle, nuanced examinations of power dynamics and privilege” and calls it “a brilliantly paced edge-of-your seat adventure.” The review concludes, “Authors should take note—this is how you do fantasy in a global world.”

 

Joshua David Bellin‘s SURVIVAL COLONY 9 garnered two great blurbs in June:
“Joshua David Bellin brings serious game in a post-apocalyptic thriller that collides breathless action with devious world building and genuine heart. A terrific novel!” — Jonathan Maberry, New York Times bestselling author of Rot & Ruin and V-Wars

“Set in a gritty post-apocalyptic world, SURVIVAL COLONY 9 is both an adventure and an exploration of what it means to be human.” –Margaret Peterson Haddix, New York Times Bestselling author of the Missing Series

 

Publishers Weekly says that AdriAnne Strickland “raises questions of identity and belonging” in her “fast-paced debut,” WORDLESS! Read the full review here.

 

Tara Dairman‘s ALL FOUR STARS got a rave review from Booklist: “Gladys is a lovable character with plenty of spunk and desire, and readers will happily cheer her on, while the fresh plot adds a delicious dimension to the host of stories set in sixth grade.”

Congratulations to the following OneFour authors recently nominated for YALSA’s Best Fiction for Young Adults list: BREAKFAST SERVED ANYTIME by Sarah Combs, CAMINAR by Skila Brown, FAKE ID by Lamar Giles, SEKRET by Lindsay Smith, A MAD, WICKED FOLLY by Sharon Biggs Waller, and THE VIGILANTE POETS OF SELWYN ACADEMY by Kate Hattemer.

 

Dana Alison Levy‘s THE MISADVENTURES OF THE FAMILY FLETCHER got a starred review from Kirkus, who said, “The Fletcher family rules!” It was also a Summer 2014 Kids’ Indie Next Pick and received a starred review from School Library Journal, who praised its “laugh-out-loud humor, and mix of zaniness and love. Fans of Beverly Cleary’s Quimbys, Judy Blume’s Hatchers, and, more recently, Jeanne Birdsall’s Penderwicks will fervently hope that more Fletcher misadventures are yet to come.”

 

THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN WITCHES by Lauren Magaziner got a starred review from Kirkus: “Magaziner’s youthful narrative voice is distinctly aural: Her characters swish and swoop, clomp and screech. Her storytelling cauldron mixes the right balance of bizarre and banal, and she turns up the heat as the witch exam approaches. Readers will banish themselves from the ordinary world to finish this book in a flash.” THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN WITCHES also got a wonderful review from Publishers Weekly: “The same goofy charm that Magaziner brings to the names of characters and settings (Mrs. Gummyum, Yammerstop Way) carries through to the details of witch life and logic in the town of Gliverstoll, resulting in a fun, frothy story that will, well, charm its readers.”

 

GILDED by Christina Farley was nominated for the Morning Calm Award in Korea in the high school division.

 

PUSH GIRL by Jessica Love and Chelsie Hill is out now, and Booklist says, “Authors Hill and Love write a moving novel…This is an emotional story with elements any teen reader can relate to, primarily the search for one’s own identity. Readers will be inspired and moved by Kara’s amazing journey.”

 

THE SECRET SIDE OF EMPTY by Maria Andreu won a National Indie Excellence® Book Award. School Library Journal says of THE SECRET SIDE OF EMPTY, “captivating,” and “Andreu deftly captures the protagonist’s desires, despair, and determination in this peek at a side of American life not often seen in YA literature”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer says, “This story is perfectly timed.”

 

Booklist says of Tracy Holczer‘s, THE SECRET HUM OF A DAISY, “Readers who appreciate the quiet confidence and maturity of Cynthia Rylant’s, Patricia MacLachlan’s, and Katherine Paterson’s protagonists will find a new author to enjoy.” It’s also an Indie Next Pick for summer, and was recently featured in the San Francisco Chronicle.

 

Lori M. Lee‘s GATES OF THREAD AND STONE sold World French rights to AdA.

 

The Indonesia publisher Fantasious has purchased the Bahasa translation rights to Danielle L. Jensen‘s STOLEN SONGBIRD and HIDDEN HUNTRESS!

 

Jaye Robin Brown, or JRo to most everyone but her mama, lives and writes in the Appalachian mountains north of Asheville, NC. She’s fond of dogs, horses, laughter, the absurd and the ironic. When not crafting stories she hangs out with teenagers in the high school art room where she teaches. Her debut novel, NO PLACE TO FALL (Harper Teen, December ’14), is a love song to small town girls and mountain music.
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An Interview With A Cover Illustrator (And Not Just Any Cover Illustrator, but MINE!)

There are a few misconceptions about this publishing business (nope, sorry Mom- I will not be buying you a yacht anytime soon) and one of the bigger ones is that writers have infinite input into their cover designs (or, in the case of picture books, the illustrations). Most people are shocked- shocked, I tell you!- to learn that this is very rarely the case. More likely, the writer will be innocently checking email on an otherwise ordinary day and find a note from our editor that says something like, “I hope you like your cover! Here it is!”

And then (if you’re me) you exhale and do a Snoopy dance around your living room. Seriously, I could not love my cover more if I had drawn it myself (wow- do you really not want to see that!!) I love it so much that I googled my cover illustrator, Annabelle Metayer, and immediately sent a gushy email through her website contact form. Fortunately, she is uber-cool and was not scared off by said gushiness. In fact, she even agreed to let me interview her here about how this whole cover design thing works:

Hey Annabelle! Thanks for being here and letting us uncover a little more of the mystery behind this process. Can you start off by telling us who you work with at a publishing house? In other words, who hires you?

It varies from one publishing house to another, but in most cases, it’s the book designer who contacts my agent with a mandate. Before contacting the illustrator/agent, the book designer presents the portfolio to their editing team. If everyone is onboard, they can sign me!

Nice! And from there, what kind of information does the publisher usually provide you with? Are you typically given suggestions/direction from the publisher for the cover illustration or do you come up with your own?

It is mostly a collaborative task. Sometimes, all I get is the manuscript, with no specific briefing, or I’ll get a few starting ideas. After reading the book, I provide two or three sketches for any kind of scenarios that inspire me, adding the ones that the editor provided me with, if they did.

In some other cases, I have been hired to work on the cover for books that have been signed but for which the manuscript is not yet available. The book designer then just gives me the synopsis and a few ideas to get me started.

And in some other cases, I get a specific briefing, as in ‘Girl sitting in a coffee shop, with books on table, Eiffel tower in background.”

I enjoy all of these scenarios -it’s great to have carte blanche with a cover but a precise briefing allows me to focus solely on character/background development.

And to further demonstrate how this all might look, Annabelle is sharing her process for my cover (swoon!):

(click on images to enlarge)

cover designs

 

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I could look at that all day! Thanks for sharing! Okay, a few more questions. How did you get your start in illustrating?

For me, it was a long process. I always loved to draw but did not quite trust that my passion for drawing could be translated into a career. I opted instead for a happy compromise: graphic design. As a graphic designer, I discovered the joy of Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop! After about 12 years, I finally decided to use my Illustrator skills to build an illustration portfolio. After finding my wonderful agent Sally (heflinreps.com) and with a few jobs under my belt, I made the full-time jump, knowing that it takes about 10 years on average for an illustrator to become established (but also secretely lured by the knowledge that this quest can be done in the comfort of my pajamas).

Pajamas influencing your career choice- congratulations, you’re officially one of the tribe! What is your favorite part about illustrating covers?

What’s not to love! First, there is the thrill of being ‘chosen’ by a publishing house to illustrate a cover. Then, the excitement of immersing myself into the universe of a new story and, once the basic layout has been approved, working on the character. Choosing her clothes and hairstyle and finding cute ways to represent the items surrounding her. Oh! and last but not least : receiving positive feedback from the book author. I really never expect it, but at the end of the day, the author being happy with their cover is the ultimate reward! So it’s a bonus, when it happens.

Oh, it happens! And what about some of the challenges?

When sending the very initial sketches to the client (especially new clients!), I can get a bit anxious while waiting for feedback. I compare this to ‘stage fright’, for an actor. No matter how experienced you are, I don’t think it will ever go away. I am very lucky that I can get all my sketches validated by my husband who is an art director, though! Anyways, once the ice is broken and I get a first response, I relax.

Annabelle, thanks so much for letting me interview you. I can only hope I spot your illustrations on a million book covers (including more of mine)!

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Happy 14th Day: December

It’s the last 14th Day announcement of the year–which means we’re SO CLOSE to our debut year! I’m filling in for Amber, which means of course I’m going mad with power. Onto the news!

Releases

Robin Constantine is ending the year right with the release of THE PROMISE OF AMAZING on December 31, 2013.

Heidi Schulz has a release date (September 16, 2014) for her HOOK’S REVENGE

Lori M. Lee’s GATES OF THREAD AND STONE is set for release on August 5, 2014.

SPIRIT’S KEY by Edith Cohn is due for release on September 9, 2014.

Sales and Rights

THE SECRET HUM OF A DAISY by Tracy Holczer sold in a two-book deal at auction in Germany.

THE CHANCE YOU WON’T RETURN by Annie Cardi will be sold as an audiobook through Brilliance Audio.

THE WALLED CITY by Ryan Graudin has been picked up by France (Jean Claude Lattes), Germany (Rowolht Verlag), Norway (Cappelen Damm) and Brazil (Editora Schwarcz

Meredith McCardle‘s THE EIGHTH GUARDIAN will be an audiobook.

Websites

Chris Struyk-Bonn has a new website.

Heidi Schulz has a new website.

Nikki Sheehan has revamped her site.

Jen Malone has a new website.

Dana Alison Levy has a new website.

Blurbs and Reviews

GILDED by Christy Farley received a blurb from Jessica Khoury, author of ORIGIN and VITRO: “Farley brings South Korea’s fascinating culture and mythology into vivid detail in this shining debut, and Jae is a compelling heroine. An exotic, thrilling read, GILDED had me utterly entranced!”

WHEN AUDREY MET ALICE by Rebecca Behrens got a shiny review in Kirkus: “This charming debut brings Alice Roosevelt to life when 13-year-old “first daughter” Audrey finds Alice’s century-old diary and turns to it for advice…An appealing journey and a fascinating life.”

Giveaways

Meredith McCardle is giving away a Kindle Paperwhite version of THE EIGHTH GUARDIAN to celebrate her cover reveal (see below).

Christine Kohler is giving away a copy of NO SURRENDER SOLDIER on Goodreads during January.

Cover Reveals

Danielle Ellison’s SALT:

Danielle L. Jensen’s STOLEN SONGBIRD:

Ryan Gebhart’s THERE WILL BE BEARS

Dahlia Adler’s BEHIND THE SCENES

Meredith McCardle’s THE EIGHTH GUARDIAN

Annie Cardi’s THE CHANCE YOU WON’T RETURN

That’s all the news for this month. See you in January (2014!!!) for more OneFour news!

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All for One and OneFour KidLit

Happy New Year, everybody! We are OneFour KidLit, a collection of young adult and kidlit authors making our publishing debuts in 2014, and we’re thrilled to be joining the blogging world. We write everything from YA paranormal to middle grade contemporary to sci-fi thrillers. If you want to find out a little more about us individually, check out our author list page, where you can find our individual websites and a little about our upcoming novels. No matter what you read, there’s something to add to your 2014 TBR list.

In the year leading up to our debut year, we’re looking forward to: 

  • Sharing our experiences as writers–the editorial process, how we got published, and more.
  • Thoughts about YA and children’s lit in general.
  • Interviewing 2013 debut authors, who will share with us all their infinite wisdom about being a debut author–right, guys?
  • Cover reveals, giveaways, and conference info.
  • Meeting and interacting with readers, writers, and general kidlit enthusiasts.
  • And, of course, hilarious gifs.

So if any of the above sounds appealing to you, you’re in the right place. Join us over the next couple years as we navigate the strange waters of the debut publishing process. If that’s still not enough, you can also follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Are you a 2014 YA/kidlit debut author, too? If so, join us! Check out our Becoming a Member page for more info on how to be part of OneFour KidLit.

Thanks so much for coming to check us out. Here’s to an awesome year of writerly goodness and excitement!