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Release day for COMPULSION by Martina Boone

compulsion release day

My name is Jan, and I’m Martina Boone’s assistant. I’m hijacking her release day post, because COMPULSION is the book of MY heart, not just Martina’s.

In December 2012, she sent me a manuscript called FIRE CARRIER. And I fell in love with the setting, the characters, and the story. I knew from the first read-through of the first draft that this was THE book, the one that would get her an agent and a deal. Now, Martina is a VERY humble person, so she didn’t realize just how fantastic this book was. So we worked on it, back and forth, through about 15 revisions. I told her I thought it was ready, and she (humbly) agreed that it might be. So she started querying, and it didn’t take long at all. Amanda Panitch at Lippincott Massie McQuilken pulled it from the slush pile and gave it to Kent Wolf. There were a few more revisions, then Annette Pollert at Simon Pulse loved it too. Somewhere along the way, it became COMPULSION. And that’s all she wrote.

From the very beginning, since that early draft called FIRE CARRIER, I have loved and championed this book. I’ve always been a reader, and I have read a LOT of books. But this unedited draft was one of the best books I’d ever read, and through revisions and editing, it’s only gotten better.

And now that I’ve rambled on, I’ll get to the real post. An interview with Martina.

Talk to me about the setting for COMPULSION. Why the South?

The South is both picturesque and heartbreaking. It’s also full of history, Spanish moss, crumbling houses, and people who are tied to each other by blood, duty, and secrets. That’s gold for anyone who’s working on a novel.

Watson Island is loosely based on Edisto Island, and I borrowed from actual Charleston area plantation history to create the three plantations that shaped who the three families became. There was tons of material to work with-I mean, pirate treasure, ancient spirit witches, blood feuds, lonely, demented characters, curses, forbidden romance . . . How could I resist?

Why is THIS story the one you had to tell?

Pirates, ghosts, witches, voodoo, treasure, forbidden love, mystery, murder? Who wouldn’t want to tell this story? LOL. Seriously, it’s the loneliness of the characters, their quest to find each other, and ultimately their ability to save each other or destroy each other. The characters became as real for me as my own family, and I wanted to share them to make them live for other people, too.

Why Eight? Is that anything like Four?

Nope. Not at all. Family and tradition are big in the South, and that’s even more true on Watson Island where the family histories go back three hundred years and the gift is passed down to the oldest child. Eight is short for Charles Beaufort, VIII. His father is Seven. And obviously, that tradition goes back a few years. 🙂

Speaking of Eight, what makes him the perfect hero for this story?

Eight makes Barrie stronger and helps her see herself through his eyes, helping her to realize that she is more than she ever thought she could be.

What was the most surprising part of writing COMPULSION?

How it turned out. People who read my blog, AdventuresInYAPublishing.com may know that I used to think of myself as a plotter. I wrote outlines. Long outlines. Thirty or forty thousand word outlines. And if someone asked me to write a synopsis of a book, I had to first write the outline – at which point, I eventually realized that I wasn’t writing an outline at all; I was writing a first draft. I don’t know where I first heard the word, but someone somewhere mentioned doing something they called a discovery draft. Coming across that term was one of the biggest AHA! moments of my life. So yeah. It turns out I’m not a plotter, but I’m also not completely a pantser. I’m a plantser. With COMPULSION, I knew where I was going – I had that draft to use as a roadmap, but things kept changing. I was constantly surprised.

The relationships in COMPULSION are very complex. Do you feel like that’s realistic?

I think that junior high and high school aren’t very realistic. They can be horrible, terrible places where people do things to each other than I can’t even imagine putting into a book. Schools are all about finding who you are, and that’s what books are about. I feel like sometimes writers need to make things a little bigger in a book to give readers the chance to let themselves feel like what’s happening is removed from them, even while it is speaking directly to them. I mean, are there going to be Hunger Games in the near future? Man, I hope not. But that doesn’t make Katniss’ feelings resonate with me any less.

What was the hardest part about writing COMPULSION?

There are several scenes that made me cry—and I still teared up even when I was reviewing copyedits, despite having been through something like a hundred and forty-seven drafts (okay, maybe not quite that many…). But yeah, there are a lot of emotional scenes that wrung me out and left me feeling like a strand of overcooked spaghetti. Hands down the hardest scene for me to write was the beginning, though, which is ironic because I founded and still mentor the First Five Pages Workshop, where I (along with some AMAZING authors) help aspiring writers nail the early part of their manuscript.

My problem with the beginning is that Barrie is literally broken at that point, but the reader doesn’t know that. Even Barrie doesn’t know it fully. It was so hard trying to find a way to show the reader a girl who would be interesting to read about, a girl who would become strong, while at the same time hinting at her brokenness—at the way that she perceives herself before she’s found that she is worth loving. Barrie is like a lot of girls who don’t recognize the strength and beauty within themselves.

What makes COMPULSION different from the other Southern Gothics coming out?

At its essence, the Southern Gothic fiction I really love is about haunted families and the kind of tradition that passes down from one generation to another whether the next generation wants it or not. It’s about haunting settings, quirky characters, and dangerous situations, but it’s also about epic love. COMPULSION is about all of that in equal measure, but it’s also a coming of age story, a story about finding your place, your family, yourself. There are definitely weird, memorable characters. Someone I really respect once described it as MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD AND EVIL meets ROMEO AND JULIET meets THE SIXTH SENSE. I hope that’s kind of different.

Talk to me about insta-love. There’s a moment when the love between Eight and Barrie feels that way, even though it isn’t. Did you worry about that when you were writing?

If you stop reading at the point where Eight and Barrie meet because you think it’s going to be insta-love, you’re going to miss discovering that that’s very far from the case. They fall for each other fast because they go through a lot. But they also have extenuating circumstances. And trust me, their love story is far from over yet.

As far as insta-love in general goes? My husband told me he loved me in the middle of a poker party a month after we met. We married less than a year after we met, and we’re still married. Love can happen very fast and still be real and lasting. I’m not personally a fan of the kind of insta-love where a character is in danger but the second she sees a hot guy, all she can do is think about how hot he is. Or the kind where one or two super-hot guys fall in love with a heroine who’s not only ordinary looking but doesn’t really do anything that makes her stand out. Barrie takes action early on, even though she’s scared and not used to handling things on her own. She’s naïve, so sometimes her decisions aren’t the smartest, but you know what? I was making naïve decisions when I was a lot older than Barrie. That’s what I love the most about her. She does the best she can at the time. It isn’t always perfect.

What are you doing today to celebrate release day?

Running around like a crazy person, because I’m in the middle of the Compelling Reads Tour and have an event tonight at the library in Bethesda, MD. I did spend some time with friends both in person and online last night at midnight though. Oh and I went to the bookstore this morning to sign (and pet) their copies of COMPULSION.

About the Book

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Three plantations. Two gifts. One ancient curse.

All her life, Barrie Watson has been a virtual prisoner in the house where she lives with her shut-in mother. When her mother dies, Barrie promises to put some mileage on her stiletto heels. But she finds a new kind of prison at her aunt’s South Carolina plantation instead–a prison guarded by an ancient spirit who long ago cursed one of the three founding families of Watson Island and gave the others magical gifts that became compulsions.

Stuck with the ghosts of a generations-old feud and hunted by forces she cannot see, Barrie must find a way to break free of the family legacy. With the help of sun-kissed Eight Beaufort, who somehow seems to know what Barrie wants before she knows herself, the last Watson heir starts to unravel her family’s twisted secrets. What she finds is dangerous: a love she never expected, a river that turns to fire at midnight, a gorgeous cousin who isn’t what she seems, and very real enemies who want both Eight and Barrie dead.

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Indiebound | Goodreads

Martina Boone writes contemporary fantasy set in the kinds of magical places she would love to visit. She is the founder of YA Series Insiders and Adventures in YA Publishing, a two-time Writer’s Digest 101 Best Websites for Writers blog. She’d be quite happy on a desert island, as long as she had her family, her dog, her cat, plenty of books, and a way to keep writing. Oh, and vats of Nutella.
COMPULSION, the first novel in her Heirs of Watson Island YA Southern Gothic trilogy, released on October 28, 2014.

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The Author’s Voice: interview with OneFour author Jen Malone

NYC! Fancy hotels! Cupcake parties! And a junior hotel concierge with one precious, missing, hotel guest.

Jen Malone speaks with us about her MG debut, AT YOUR SERVICE.

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Jen Malone has visited 50 countries, met her husband on the highway (literally) and went into labor with her identical twins while on Stevie Nick’s tour bus. These days she prefers to keep the drama inside the pages of her books. Her debut middle grade, AT YOUR SERVICE, releases in August from Simon & Schuster/Aladdin. Please visit Jen on Twitter @jenmalonewrites.

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Kate Boorman is an independent artist and writer from the Canadian prairies. She was born in Nepal (where she was carried up the Himalayas in a basket) and she grew up in a small Albertan town (where she rode her bike to Girl Guides). She is fond of creepy things. Speaking of! Her YA fantasy WINTERKILL debuts September 9th, 2014 (Abrams/Amulet and Faber & Faber).
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The Author’s Voice: interview with OneFour author Bethany Neal

Fragmented memories and irreversible decisions: Bethany speaks with us about her YA thriller debut, MY LAST KISS (FSG, June 2014).

 

 

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Kate Boorman is an independent artist and writer from the Canadian prairies. She was born in Nepal (where she was carried up the Himalayas in a basket) and she grew up in a small Albertan town (where she rode her bike to Girl Guides). She is fond of creepy things. Speaking of! Her YA fantasy WINTERKILL debuts September 9th, 2014 (Abrams/Amulet and Faber & Faber).
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Yum! Chatting about food in kidlit

The rise of the “foodie” book is one of our favorite new developments in kidlit, and this spring/summer is seeing the launches of two foodie-themed OneFour titles! Cupcake Cousins by Kate Hannigan (Disney-Hyperion, May 13) tells the story of fourth-graders Willow and Delia, two cousins who are hoping that their skills in the kitchen will earn them a promotion from flower girls (bleh!) to pastry chefs (yum!) for their aunt’s wedding, and All Four Stars by Tara Dairman (Putnam/Penguin, July 10) introduces sixth-grader Gladys Gatsby, who secretly becomes a restaurant critic for the all-powerful New York Standard newspaper.

Kate and Tara came together to answer four questions about food, writing, and the celebrity chefs who changed their lives. What could be more delicious?

All Four Stars by Tara Dairman CoverWhy are your characters so interested in food?

Tara: Gladys’s interest in food definitely springs from my own experiences. When I conceived of her character, I was in my mid-20’s, living in New York City, experimenting with recipes in my apartment’s tiny kitchen and trying new restaurants whenever my budget would allow. It felt like quite the culinary adventure compared to my suburban childhood in a family of microwave and take-out addicts–and I thought that the tension between those two worlds might be an interesting backdrop for a kids’ story.

Kate: And it’s funny because with the popularity of cooking shows, today’s kids are more exposed to the idea of good food and wonderful recipes. So food is definitely a popular topic. My characters are so interested in food because my kids are. They want to experiment with the things they see on Cupcake Wars  or Chopped. I found that when my daughter was in third and fourth grades, when friends came over, they wanted to bake cupcakes together. So a lot of what happens to Willow and Delia in my book comes from watching my own kids and their friends.

Why did you focus on food with your book?

Cupcake Cousins Cover medium fileKate: I wanted to create strong and interesting girls who are deeply engaged in their interests. Girls “making and doing” and really living life. And I think cooking and food are easy access points for engaging kids. Who doesn’t love a cupcake?

When kids get in the kitchen and start understanding what goes into the food they eat, they begin to take ownership of things. Not necessarily in big ways, but it’s laying a foundation for so much. Dumping in a quarter cup of this, one-third cup that, doubling recipes. Suddenly, they’re a whiz at fractions! When they see what binds together in a recipe, they’re gaining a sense of science in action.

And there is so much pride in a dish well-served. I think cooking is an easy and fun way to help kids gain a sense of self – self-identity, confidence, and all those great traits that come with feeling competent in something. Plus, it’s fun.

Tara: I love your reasons, Kate! I agree that kids have a great capacity for becoming deeply engaged in specific areas that intrigue them, so making Gladys somewhat obsessed with food and cooking was an easy choice. And on the reader side, well, we all have to eat, right? So a food-driven plotline seems to be something that any kind of reader can connect with, even if they’re not chefs or foodies themselves.

Who has been the most influential person in your food life? 

Tara: Mark Bittman–author of How to Cook Everything–literally taught me how to cook everything. I was 20 years old and had never boiled a pot of water when a friend recommended that cookbook to me as a good place to start learning. I still use it today, though its dust jacket is long gone and its binding is totally cracked. I probably should have dedicated All Four Stars to him….well, there’s always the sequel. 🙂

Kate: My influences are more like a salad bar – I pick and choose this and that. So it’s hard to think of one person who had the most impact. But I will say that I am most inspired by Chicago restaurateur Stephanie Izard. She’s not only the executive chef of one of the city’s very best restaurants, Girl & the Goat, but she was also the first woman to win Bravo’s “Top Chef.” I have so much respect for her as she’s risen to the top in a male-dominated field. Anytime I have a reason to celebrate, I dine at Stephanie’s Girl & the Goat. She’s a remarkable woman and a great role model for girls who want to be chefs when they grow up. And she was nice enough to read Cupcake Cousins and comment on it for the book cover.

Tara: A blurb from a real-life chef—how awesome, Kate! 🙂


What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever made/eaten?

Whoopee Pies w Olivia

Kate’s whoopee pie coming at ya!

Kate: I’ve gone dessert crazy in recent years, making a malted milkball cake I saw on Pinterest, insane chocolate-raspberry cakes at Christmastime, and Halloween cakepops for my kids (two October birthdays in our house). Plus I test all the recipes that are in Cupcake Cousins on my family over and over again. But the dish I’m most proud of making has to do with Julia Child. After watching the movie Julie & Julia, which featured Irma S. Rombauer (author of The Joy of Cooking) together with Julia herself, I was inspired to try Irma’s Boeuf Bourguignon. So in the same red French oven as in the film, I made the most amazing dish, complete with a French accent. It was a hoot, and I am still very proud of it. Though I’ve never attempted it again. . . !

Tara: Kate, you’ve got me drooling! When can I come over for dinner (and dessert)??

Green tea cupcake batter! It's green!

Tara’s green tea cupcake batter–it’s green!

I’ve also been testing recipes inspired by All Four Stars on my family and friends over the past year (and will be sharing the results soon on my website). One of the wackier recipes I had to “invent” was green tea cupcakes with sesame icing. Matcha green tea powder and tahini (ground sesame seed paste) both have strong flavors, so it definitely took some experimenting to get the balance right.

As for coolest thing I’ve ever eaten…well, I was lucky enough to spend two years backpacking around the world, so I sampled quite a few interesting dishes in that time. I’m not sure what to award the “coolest” crown to—hippo jerky (Zambia)? Fermented camel’s milk (Mauritania)? Donkey (China)?

I’ll go slightly less exotic and choose pan de yuca—Colombian cheese bread. Found in Colombia, Ecuador, and a fantastic little bakery in Chelsea, Manhattan called Big Booty Bread (where they’re also called “cheese rocks”). If mac and cheese were a gluten-free bread, it would be pan de yuca. Yum.

Hungry for even more?

Find Kate Hannigan at her website, on her blog, or on Twitter!
Find Tara Dairman at her website/blog, on Facebook, or on Twitter!

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An Interview With A Cover Illustrator (And Not Just Any Cover Illustrator, but MINE!)

There are a few misconceptions about this publishing business (nope, sorry Mom- I will not be buying you a yacht anytime soon) and one of the bigger ones is that writers have infinite input into their cover designs (or, in the case of picture books, the illustrations). Most people are shocked- shocked, I tell you!- to learn that this is very rarely the case. More likely, the writer will be innocently checking email on an otherwise ordinary day and find a note from our editor that says something like, “I hope you like your cover! Here it is!”

And then (if you’re me) you exhale and do a Snoopy dance around your living room. Seriously, I could not love my cover more if I had drawn it myself (wow- do you really not want to see that!!) I love it so much that I googled my cover illustrator, Annabelle Metayer, and immediately sent a gushy email through her website contact form. Fortunately, she is uber-cool and was not scared off by said gushiness. In fact, she even agreed to let me interview her here about how this whole cover design thing works:

Hey Annabelle! Thanks for being here and letting us uncover a little more of the mystery behind this process. Can you start off by telling us who you work with at a publishing house? In other words, who hires you?

It varies from one publishing house to another, but in most cases, it’s the book designer who contacts my agent with a mandate. Before contacting the illustrator/agent, the book designer presents the portfolio to their editing team. If everyone is onboard, they can sign me!

Nice! And from there, what kind of information does the publisher usually provide you with? Are you typically given suggestions/direction from the publisher for the cover illustration or do you come up with your own?

It is mostly a collaborative task. Sometimes, all I get is the manuscript, with no specific briefing, or I’ll get a few starting ideas. After reading the book, I provide two or three sketches for any kind of scenarios that inspire me, adding the ones that the editor provided me with, if they did.

In some other cases, I have been hired to work on the cover for books that have been signed but for which the manuscript is not yet available. The book designer then just gives me the synopsis and a few ideas to get me started.

And in some other cases, I get a specific briefing, as in ‘Girl sitting in a coffee shop, with books on table, Eiffel tower in background.”

I enjoy all of these scenarios -it’s great to have carte blanche with a cover but a precise briefing allows me to focus solely on character/background development.

And to further demonstrate how this all might look, Annabelle is sharing her process for my cover (swoon!):

(click on images to enlarge)

cover designs

 

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I could look at that all day! Thanks for sharing! Okay, a few more questions. How did you get your start in illustrating?

For me, it was a long process. I always loved to draw but did not quite trust that my passion for drawing could be translated into a career. I opted instead for a happy compromise: graphic design. As a graphic designer, I discovered the joy of Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop! After about 12 years, I finally decided to use my Illustrator skills to build an illustration portfolio. After finding my wonderful agent Sally (heflinreps.com) and with a few jobs under my belt, I made the full-time jump, knowing that it takes about 10 years on average for an illustrator to become established (but also secretely lured by the knowledge that this quest can be done in the comfort of my pajamas).

Pajamas influencing your career choice- congratulations, you’re officially one of the tribe! What is your favorite part about illustrating covers?

What’s not to love! First, there is the thrill of being ‘chosen’ by a publishing house to illustrate a cover. Then, the excitement of immersing myself into the universe of a new story and, once the basic layout has been approved, working on the character. Choosing her clothes and hairstyle and finding cute ways to represent the items surrounding her. Oh! and last but not least : receiving positive feedback from the book author. I really never expect it, but at the end of the day, the author being happy with their cover is the ultimate reward! So it’s a bonus, when it happens.

Oh, it happens! And what about some of the challenges?

When sending the very initial sketches to the client (especially new clients!), I can get a bit anxious while waiting for feedback. I compare this to ‘stage fright’, for an actor. No matter how experienced you are, I don’t think it will ever go away. I am very lucky that I can get all my sketches validated by my husband who is an art director, though! Anyways, once the ice is broken and I get a first response, I relax.

Annabelle, thanks so much for letting me interview you. I can only hope I spot your illustrations on a million book covers (including more of mine)!

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Edith Cohn: SPIRIT’S KEY

We’ve got a great group of debut authors here at OneFour KidLit. Today we’re introducing Edith Cohn. One author, four questions. Here we go!

SpiritsKey

What’s your debut book about? Can you share any cool details with us?

My debut novel SPIRIT’S KEY is a mystery about a twelve-year-old psychic girl named Spirit who works with the ghost of her pet dog to uncover the truth of the mysterious deaths of wild dogs on the remote island where she lives.

Cool details about the book —This book is an interesting mix of genres—mystery, light fantasy, adventure, and paranormal. I’d never written anything like it before. I’d only written YA contemporary novels—none of which I was able to sell. One of my friends, who was surprised I would attempt to write something with fantasy elements said, “But you don’t even read fantasy.” Actually this wasn’t true. But I’d written contemporary for so long—that was how people thought of me. The doubts crept in. Had I read enough fantasy to be qualified to write one? Could I get away with never saying exactly where this island was located? Could I make up weird superstitions and beliefs? What were the rules for middle grade? To hush my doubts, I wrote in my notebook in big bold letters: IT’S YOUR ISLAND. YOU CAN DO WHAT YOU WANT! This became my mantra.

But even though the setting of Bald Island is made up, I drew a lot of inspiration from the very real Outer Banks of North Carolina. I did a lot of research that inspired the book, and some of the strangest superstitions in the story are actually based on things I read. For example, the characters in SPIRIT’S KEY drink yaupon tea to cure their anger. And actual early settlers on the Outer Banks believed this tea cured the drinker of anger and falsehoods.

What are you most excited about in the debut process?

I’m really looking forward to having actual kid readers. I want to hear what they think and have the opportunity to talk to them in schools. I used to teach 7th grade, and it will be nice to have the chance to teach kids about writing again. I’m also crossing my fingers for fan mail. 😉

What cool facts might readers not know about you?

Edith_Cohn-9744-2Probably the first thing you should know about me is that I am a crazy dog lady. I even have a bumper sticker on my car that says so! Really this just means, my dog Leia is my little fur baby. I kind of run my life around her happiness.

Also, when I’m not reading or writing, I’m crafting handmade dog collars or jewelry. I used to have an Etsy store called BUTTERPUPS, where I sold dog collars for fancy pups. Now I just do it for fun. These typewriter rings are really popular amongst my friends. If you want one, the cost is two preordered copies of SPIRIT’S KEY. Email me your receipt (edithcohn(at)gmail.com), and I’ll mail you one with your initial. The ring bases are pretty pricey, so please be honest and follow through with the book order. I also only have a handful of the ring bases left, so this is only while supplies last. 1970623_10153944009685654_2031927106_n

What are your desert island books?

In some ways being on a desert island seems like a dream come true for an introvert writer, but it also sounds kind of painful. I just reread THE GIVER by Lois Lowry, and it’s a good reminder that pain is useful, so that one is a must. I think BREADCRUMBS by Anne Ursu is also a great reminder of this. Here’s my favorite line, “This is what it is to live in the world. You have to give yourself over to the cold, at least a little bit.” I’d have to bring my go-to craft books like BIRD BY BIRD by Anne Lamott, ART AND FEAR by David Bayles and Ted Orland and SAVE THE CAT by Blake Snyder. I’d also really like to have a notebook so I could write.

Edith Cohn was born and raised in North Carolina where she grew up exploring the unique beaches of the Outer Banks. She currently lives in the coyote-wild hills of Los Angeles with her husband and her dog. All of these things provided inspiration for her middle grade novel, SPIRIT’S KEY, a mystery about a girl and her ghost dog, coming September 9th from FSG/Macmillan.

 

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Mary Crockett: DREAM BOY

dream-boy-cover-300

I’ve always been a dreamer. Daydreams. Night dreams. Dreams of grandeur and dreams of escape. If I were an onion and you pulled back the papery outside, you’d find layer after layer of eye-watering dreams. And in the center, where there’s that little curlicue of onion heart? There’d be a puff of smoke from the dreams that burned away.

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Annabelle Manning feels like she’s doing time at her high school in Chilton, Virginia. She has her friends at her lunchtime table of nobodies. What she doesn’t have are possibilities. Or a date for Homecoming. Things get more interesting at night, when she spends time with the boy of her dreams. But the blue-eyed boy with the fairytale smile is just that—a dream. Until the Friday afternoon he walks into her chemistry class.

One of friends suspects he’s an alien. Another is pretty sure it’s all one big case of déjà vu. While Annabelle doesn’t know what to think, she’s willing to believe that the charming Martin Zirkle may just be her dream come true. But as Annabelle discovers the truth behind dreams—where they come from and what they mean—she is forced to face a dark reality she had not expected. More than just Martin has arrived in Chilton. As Annabelle learns, if dreams can come true, so can nightmares.

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Eerie, twisty, fast and funny, Dream Boy will forever change the way you see your dreams–and your nightmares. An exciting, imaginative look at what might happen when people from the corners of your mind suddenly show up in your real life.”– Lois Metzger, author of A Trick of the Light

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One author, four questions. Today we’re talking to Mary Crockett, coauthor with Madelyn Rosenberg of DREAM BOY, coming July 1 from Sourcebooks Fire.

What’s your debut book about? Can you share any details with us?

DREAM BOY is about a girl whose dreams are so powerful that she literally brings her dream boy to life.

In short hand: Girl dreams boy. Girl meets boy. Girl, boy, and friends save universe.

It’s kind of like the movie Inception, but in reverse… and in high school.

Probably what I loved most about writing this book, though, is how it plays with different genres. The book is contemporary, but a fantasy. There’s romance, but there’s some scary stuff, too. There are seriously comic moments… and some seriously serious ones.

All in all, I got to express a lot of different parts of myself while writing DREAM BOY with Madelyn—and that was so much fun for me as a writer.

What was it like writing a book with a coauthor?

The best! I love Madelyn. She’s both astoundingly creative and exceedingly patient—which is a wonderful combination in a coauthor.

We’d pass the book back and forth by email—each combing through whatever came before and then writing the next chunk. We both felt empowered to change whatever we thought needed changing, and for the most part, we agreed.

There were, of course, some points of difference—as you can see in this video Madelyn made about us working toward a compromise:

You can find out more about our coauthoring process here.

What are you most excited about for your DREAM BOY debut?

I’ve found the YA community so inspiring. Other authors, readers, bloggers, reviewers—they’ve all been incredibly welcoming. I’m just really excited to be able to share DREAM BOY with them!

Madelyn and I had soooo much fun writing this book; I can only hope someone might have as much fun reading it.

That said, it was also pretty cool to hold the Advanced Reader Copies of DREAM BOY in my hands for the first time.

HappyDance

What might people who read DREAM BOY be surprised to find out about you?

1. I’m a not-so-closet poet.

2. I’ve always harbored a secret desire to be the fortune teller for a traveling carnival.

3. I’m a big believer in keeping dream journals, but I stopped dreaming for about a year after I had my first baby. This may be because I also stopped sleeping for about a year.

4. My first job was as a toilet-seat hand model. (More about that here and here.)

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MaryCrockett LookawayMary Crockett‘s debut novel DREAM BOY is about the aftermath of dreams, the nightmare of high school, and the mystical power of an awesome pair of shoes. Mary has worked as everything from a history museum director to a toilet seat hand model. In her other life, she’s an award-winning poet/professional eavesdropper. You can find her yakking it up at Twitter, Facebook, or pretty much any coffee shop in southwestern Virginia.

Add DREAM BOY to your Goodreads shelf.

Order DREAM BOY at Indie Bound, Amazon or Barnes and Noble.