0

Edith Cohn: SPIRIT’S KEY

We’ve got a great group of debut authors here at OneFour KidLit. Today we’re introducing Edith Cohn. One author, four questions. Here we go!

SpiritsKey

What’s your debut book about? Can you share any cool details with us?

My debut novel SPIRIT’S KEY is a mystery about a twelve-year-old psychic girl named Spirit who works with the ghost of her pet dog to uncover the truth of the mysterious deaths of wild dogs on the remote island where she lives.

Cool details about the book —This book is an interesting mix of genres—mystery, light fantasy, adventure, and paranormal. I’d never written anything like it before. I’d only written YA contemporary novels—none of which I was able to sell. One of my friends, who was surprised I would attempt to write something with fantasy elements said, “But you don’t even read fantasy.” Actually this wasn’t true. But I’d written contemporary for so long—that was how people thought of me. The doubts crept in. Had I read enough fantasy to be qualified to write one? Could I get away with never saying exactly where this island was located? Could I make up weird superstitions and beliefs? What were the rules for middle grade? To hush my doubts, I wrote in my notebook in big bold letters: IT’S YOUR ISLAND. YOU CAN DO WHAT YOU WANT! This became my mantra.

But even though the setting of Bald Island is made up, I drew a lot of inspiration from the very real Outer Banks of North Carolina. I did a lot of research that inspired the book, and some of the strangest superstitions in the story are actually based on things I read. For example, the characters in SPIRIT’S KEY drink yaupon tea to cure their anger. And actual early settlers on the Outer Banks believed this tea cured the drinker of anger and falsehoods.

What are you most excited about in the debut process?

I’m really looking forward to having actual kid readers. I want to hear what they think and have the opportunity to talk to them in schools. I used to teach 7th grade, and it will be nice to have the chance to teach kids about writing again. I’m also crossing my fingers for fan mail. ;)

What cool facts might readers not know about you?

Edith_Cohn-9744-2Probably the first thing you should know about me is that I am a crazy dog lady. I even have a bumper sticker on my car that says so! Really this just means, my dog Leia is my little fur baby. I kind of run my life around her happiness.

Also, when I’m not reading or writing, I’m crafting handmade dog collars or jewelry. I used to have an Etsy store called BUTTERPUPS, where I sold dog collars for fancy pups. Now I just do it for fun. These typewriter rings are really popular amongst my friends. If you want one, the cost is two preordered copies of SPIRIT’S KEY. Email me your receipt (edithcohn(at)gmail.com), and I’ll mail you one with your initial. The ring bases are pretty pricey, so please be honest and follow through with the book order. I also only have a handful of the ring bases left, so this is only while supplies last. 1970623_10153944009685654_2031927106_n

What are your desert island books?

In some ways being on a desert island seems like a dream come true for an introvert writer, but it also sounds kind of painful. I just reread THE GIVER by Lois Lowry, and it’s a good reminder that pain is useful, so that one is a must. I think BREADCRUMBS by Anne Ursu is also a great reminder of this. Here’s my favorite line, “This is what it is to live in the world. You have to give yourself over to the cold, at least a little bit.” I’d have to bring my go-to craft books like BIRD BY BIRD by Anne Lamott, ART AND FEAR by David Bayles and Ted Orland and SAVE THE CAT by Blake Snyder. I’d also really like to have a notebook so I could write.

Edith Cohn was born and raised in North Carolina where she grew up exploring the unique beaches of the Outer Banks. She currently lives in the coyote-wild hills of Los Angeles with her husband and her dog. All of these things provided inspiration for her middle grade novel, SPIRIT’S KEY, a mystery about a girl and her ghost dog, coming September 9th from FSG/Macmillan.

 

2

Why write with poetry?

April is National Poetry Month! This month we want to highlight debut novels that release in 2014 with a strong tie to poetry. We have two middle grade novels with poetry woven throughout the story. And three novels in verse where the story is told through poetry.

This week we’re asking these authors: Why poetry? Why did you write in verse? Or how did your story come to include so many poems?

 

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tracy Holczer Secret Hum of a Daisy

THE SECRET HUM OF A DAISY

Putnam/Penguin

a middle grade novel – available May 1st

 

I have always been a fan of Robert Frost’s “less traveled” poems and had decided that somehow, someway, one of his poems would make an appearance in my story. After writing a couple of drafts, it became apparent that the poem would become one of the “clues” in Grace’s treasure hunt. Happy that I’d found a way to make it work, and after many more revisions, I went off into submissions. It wasn’t until I queried my agent and she asked that I consider giving Grace a way with words—a connection through poetry to the father she never knew—that poetry became a bigger part of the story. Once there, I couldn’t believe I’d ever written the story without it.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Robin HerreraHopeIs

HOPE IS A FERRIS WHEEL     

Amulet Books

a middle grade novel – available now

 

The main character of HOPE IS A FERRIS WHEEL, Star, has weekly vocabulary sentences to turn in. While writing the first draft, I had trouble coming up with all the words she’d use, so started doing themed lists. The first of these lists was “Emily Dickinson words.” They were fun to write, but poor Emily didn’t get to show up again.

So in the second draft, I took Emily a bit further. Star wrote a Dickinson style poem and compared the poet to her sister. In the third draft, someone saw the poem, and by the novel’s end, he’d convinced her to start a poetry club. In the fourth draft, that poetry club became the Emily Dickinson club and a major plot point.

So in my case, the poetry evolved with each draft, eventually becoming a very large part of the book! Now I can hardly remember the book without it.

 

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Skila Brown  caminar

CAMINAR        

Candlewick Press

a novel in verse – available now

Caminar came to me as poems. I assumed I’d be taking those poems and turning them into a prose story, but the poems just kept coming and they seemed to be a good fit. I think because the story, with its sometimes-solitary character, its small amount of dialogue, and its intensity of emotions and loss, really lends itself to verse. I found I could say with white space and metaphors what I was having a hard time describing with words. I also think the poems allow readers to digest at a level that’s appropriate for them. A younger reader will get the gist of what’s happening without extreme detail, while teens and adult readers can read between the lines and really absorb the tragedy that unfolded.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Linda Phillips  Crazy

CRAZY

Eerdmans Books for Young Readers 

a novel in verse – available in October 2014

Keeping a journal and filling it with poetry was a healthy outlet and a steadying force in a somewhat tumultuous childhood.  Crazy began as a series of twenty poems that I wrote as a way of trying to understand my reaction to my mother’s struggle with bipolar disorder during most of my formative years. At the time, I had no intention of ever writing a book.  After a number of the poems were published in various adult literary magazines I got the book-writing bug.  I was considering moving towards a chapbook when my writing buddy critiqued it and suggested it needed to be novel.  Then it took many revisions to effectively disengage emotionally and rework the voice into young adult.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Madeleine Kuderick   Kiss of Broken Glass
KISS OF BROKEN GLASS
Harper Teen

a YA novel – coming September 2014

 

I wrote KISS OF BROKEN GLASS in verse because it was the most authentic and gripping way to tell this story. When my protagonist Kenna is committed to a psych ward after she’s caught cutting in the school bathroom, I wanted the reader to be inside her head. Intensely close. And to experience her emotional journey in short, sharp bursts. Just like Kenna feels it.

I think writing in verse delivers this effect more powerfully than prose. But to tell you the truth, it’s not something I consciously chose to do. Instead, it chose me. From the very first sentence, Kenna’s voice was a natural fit for verse. Raw. Choked off. An abundance of emotion in a small drop of words. Writing this close to the bone is sometimes hard to sustain according to verse author Caroline Starr Rose. But in this case, it felt right. And luckily Kenna’s voice never waivered.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There you have it! Do you have a favorite novel in verse? Or novel with a poetry element? Tell us in the comments. We’d love to hear!

Skila Brown has an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts. She grew up in Kentucky and Tennessee, lived for a bit in Guatemala, and now resides with her family in Indiana. Her debut novel, CAMINAR, is available now from Candlewick Press.
0

Mad For Middle Grade: Office Space

Welcome to MAD FOR MIDDLE GRADE!  We’re here the first Monday of every month, discussing middle grade writing, chatting about from our favorite middle grade books, introducing our own middle grade titles, sharing middle grade writing advice, and generally obsess over everything middle grade! And if there’s any middle grade topic you’re interested in, we’d love to hear it in the comments!

You know what they say about April, right? April showers bring… perfect opportunities to curl up with a great middle grade book! Like, for example, our wonderful April releases:

THE NINJA LIBRARIANS
by Jen Swann Downey
Release date: April 15
Goodreads

THERE WILL BE BEARS
by Ryan Gebhart
Release date: April 22
Goodreads

THE LUCK UGLIES
by Paul Durham
Release date: April 29
Goodreads

Hooray for Jen, Ryan, and Paul–and their spectacular books!

This month, inspired by cute writing-nook pictures that many other authors have posted of their own writing spaces, we decided to show and/or describe our favorites place to write!

Question: Describe or show your office space!

Paul Durham
THE LUCK UGLIES
HarperCollins

Paul Durham 2Paul Durham

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Durham 3

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Edith Cohn
SPIRIT’S KEY
FSG/Macmillan

Edith Cohn

I write anywhere. Have lap desk, will travel.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Lauren Magaziner
THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN WITCHES
Dial/Penguin

photo-5

The view from my favorite writing spot… my bed!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Kate Hannigan
CUPCAKE COUSINS
Disney-Hyperion

Kate Hannigan

Kate Hannigan’s writing space is protected not only by her Australian shepherd, Bella, but by the double-sworded ninja her son made in first grade. Elliptical workouts optional.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Laura Marx Fitzgerlad
UNDER THE EGG
Dial/Penguin

Laura Marx Fitzgerald

We’re in a small apartment, so my commute consists of moving my laptop from a cluttered side table to the cluttered kitchen table. The writer’s life is not glamorous (at least this one isn’t).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Rachel Searles
THE LOST PLANET
Feiwel & Friends/Macmillan

Rachel Searles

I usually work either plugged into a monitor at my desk (works best for revisions) or on a couch with my feet up (allows for greater free flow of thoughts, so better for drafting), but as you can see, there is generally one constant besides my laptop: my writing buddy cats, Simon and Jack.

Rachel Searles 2~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Louise Galveston
BY THE GRACE OF TODD
Razorbill/Penguin

Louise Galveston

I have my “office” in a corner of our living room. This old roll-top belonged to my grandmother and I love all the little cubbies because I am unfortunately more of a crammer than a filer. It’s deceptively tidy right now because of spring cleaning urges. I love my “sunshine” lamp (I usually write when it’s dark out).

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tracy Holczer
THE SECRET HUM OF A DAISY
Putnam/Penguin

Tracy Holczer

I write from a chair in my living room, flanked by my small, fluffy dogs, Buster and Molly. Sometimes, I wear a fancy crown as a warning to my husband and kids that I am not to be disturbed. It doesn’t always work, though, so I’ll often leave my “office” for glamorous destinations like the public library or nearest coffee shop.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Robin Herrera
HOPE IS A FERRIS WHEEL
Amulet Books

Robin Herrera

I finally moved into an apartment big enough for an office and a real desk! Before I was using a coffee table and had no room for various things pictured here: pens, pencils, photos, and actual books. Now my office has bookcases and I can shut the door if I want… Sigh. Sadly, it also has the litter box for my cat.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Skila Brown
CAMINAR
Candlewick Press

Skila Brown

This is the view from the window over my desk. (Hence the screen. Sorry!) A giant backyard, lots of snow all winter, and always deer. There are always deer in my yard (and birds, and owls, and often coyotes.) It’s terrible for gardening but wonderful for distractions. Writers need to look out the window and let our minds wander. I feel lucky to have a great place to do that.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dana Alison Levy
THE MISADVENTURES OF THE FAMILY FLETCHER
Delacorte/Random House

Dana Alison Levy

I work in the finished attic of our house, which is a great spot as long as you are 5’6” or shorter (not a problem for me). I like it because it is MY space, and any mess I make stays just how I left it.This labeled photo shows several of my requirements for a good work day; other vitals would include lip balm, headphones, and, of course, internet-blocking software, because I have no willpower.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Gayle Rosengren
WHAT THE MOON SAID
Putnam/Penguin

Gayle Rosengren

I love my writing desk. It’s a roll top style, so if company arrives unexpectedly and my desktop’s a mess–as it’s apt to be when deadlines loom–I can just pull down the top and hide it all away! I also love my desk because it has so many nooks and crannies and drawers. There’s a just-right place foreverything from paper clips to file folders, from manuscripts to memory sticks And although it has a window, from my desk I can only see trees and sky and the occasional bird flying by, which is pleasant without being distracting.  I love my writing desk. Everything about it is perfect.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Adriana Schanen
QUINNY & HOPPER
Disney-Hyperion

“Did you get locked out?” asked a neighbor, who spotted me hanging out in the yard in mid-30 degree weather.
Nope. Actually, I was working. Sitting in an adirondack chair with my coat on, scribbling away on a manuscript.
Earlier that week, I’d written in the car, in my daughter’s bed, in the bleachers at the rink, at the town library, and while walking the dog (on my smartphone).
I do have a proper desk up in the attic. But I find that I often need to get away from it, in order to do my best work.  A change of scenery and perspective can shake loose all sorts of wonderful things from a stuck and deadline-addled mind.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Jen Malone
AT YOUR SERVICE
Aladdin/Simon & Schuster

Jen Malone

This is the handmade vintage writing desk I bought at a flea market ten years ago, which promptly went into my attic until last year (note: don’t shop like I do!) when I finally found the perfect spot for it. I love to think about the letters (maybe even books?) that may have been written on it before it was mine and also that the slanted top means I can’t even be tempted to have messy piles of stuff on it (though the inside compartment is scary). However, I confess, it’s far better suited for writing by hand, which I never do. That’s why, if you peer closely at the type on the computer screen, you’ll learn my dirty secret!

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Rebecca Behrens
WHEN AUDREY MET ALICE
Sourcebooks

Rebecca Behrens

I have many writing spots in my apartment, from my desk to the couch to the kitchen table, and writing spots in other places scattered around the city. But one of those writing places doubles as an inspiration spot, goodfor daydreaming and brainstorming and problem-solving–both for writing problems and sometimes IRL problems. Anyway, my inspiration spot is a makeshift window seat. From it I get a nice, sunny view of the sidewalk below my apartment. It makes for good people-watching. While I sit there, I can watch kids playing on the sidewalk and even catch the sunset. It wasn’t until I started cultivating my inspiration spot that I realized how important a place–or mental space–that is for writers, too. As important as an ergonomic desk chair!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

What do you think is a must-have in a writer’s space? Is there a topic you’d like us to discuss next month? Let us know in the comments!

Hope you enjoy those April showers! My tip: wear rainboots and splosh in lots of puddles! See you again when there’s May flowers… Monday May 5th, to be exact.

Lauren Magaziner is a 4th grader at heart, watches way too much TV, and loves to steal people’s toes to make Toecorn, which tastes like chewy, meaty popcorn. Only one of those is true. (Okay… you caught me. They’re all true.) Her MG debut THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN WITCHES—about a boy who becomes a witchling’s apprentice in a town full of dangerous, Toecorn-loving witches—is forth-coming from Dial/Penguin on August 14, 2014.
0

Mary Crockett: DREAM BOY

dream-boy-cover-300

I’ve always been a dreamer. Daydreams. Night dreams. Dreams of grandeur and dreams of escape. If I were an onion and you pulled back the papery outside, you’d find layer after layer of eye-watering dreams. And in the center, where there’s that little curlicue of onion heart? There’d be a puff of smoke from the dreams that burned away.

~~~

Annabelle Manning feels like she’s doing time at her high school in Chilton, Virginia. She has her friends at her lunchtime table of nobodies. What she doesn’t have are possibilities. Or a date for Homecoming. Things get more interesting at night, when she spends time with the boy of her dreams. But the blue-eyed boy with the fairytale smile is just that—a dream. Until the Friday afternoon he walks into her chemistry class.

One of friends suspects he’s an alien. Another is pretty sure it’s all one big case of déjà vu. While Annabelle doesn’t know what to think, she’s willing to believe that the charming Martin Zirkle may just be her dream come true. But as Annabelle discovers the truth behind dreams—where they come from and what they mean—she is forced to face a dark reality she had not expected. More than just Martin has arrived in Chilton. As Annabelle learns, if dreams can come true, so can nightmares.

~

Eerie, twisty, fast and funny, Dream Boy will forever change the way you see your dreams–and your nightmares. An exciting, imaginative look at what might happen when people from the corners of your mind suddenly show up in your real life.”– Lois Metzger, author of A Trick of the Light

~~~

One author, four questions. Today we’re talking to Mary Crockett, coauthor with Madelyn Rosenberg of DREAM BOY, coming July 1 from Sourcebooks Fire.

What’s your debut book about? Can you share any details with us?

DREAM BOY is about a girl whose dreams are so powerful that she literally brings her dream boy to life.

In short hand: Girl dreams boy. Girl meets boy. Girl, boy, and friends save universe.

It’s kind of like the movie Inception, but in reverse… and in high school.

Probably what I loved most about writing this book, though, is how it plays with different genres. The book is contemporary, but a fantasy. There’s romance, but there’s some scary stuff, too. There are seriously comic moments… and some seriously serious ones.

All in all, I got to express a lot of different parts of myself while writing DREAM BOY with Madelyn—and that was so much fun for me as a writer.

What was it like writing a book with a coauthor?

The best! I love Madelyn. She’s both astoundingly creative and exceedingly patient—which is a wonderful combination in a coauthor.

We’d pass the book back and forth by email—each combing through whatever came before and then writing the next chunk. We both felt empowered to change whatever we thought needed changing, and for the most part, we agreed.

There were, of course, some points of difference—as you can see in this video Madelyn made about us working toward a compromise:

You can find out more about our coauthoring process here.

What are you most excited about for your DREAM BOY debut?

I’ve found the YA community so inspiring. Other authors, readers, bloggers, reviewers—they’ve all been incredibly welcoming. I’m just really excited to be able to share DREAM BOY with them!

Madelyn and I had soooo much fun writing this book; I can only hope someone might have as much fun reading it.

That said, it was also pretty cool to hold the Advanced Reader Copies of DREAM BOY in my hands for the first time.

HappyDance

What might people who read DREAM BOY be surprised to find out about you?

1. I’m a not-so-closet poet.

2. I’ve always harbored a secret desire to be the fortune teller for a traveling carnival.

3. I’m a big believer in keeping dream journals, but I stopped dreaming for about a year after I had my first baby. This may be because I also stopped sleeping for about a year.

4. My first job was as a toilet-seat hand model. (More about that here and here.)

~

MaryCrockett LookawayMary Crockett‘s debut novel DREAM BOY is about the aftermath of dreams, the nightmare of high school, and the mystical power of an awesome pair of shoes. Mary has worked as everything from a history museum director to a toilet seat hand model. In her other life, she’s an award-winning poet/professional eavesdropper. You can find her yakking it up at Twitter, Facebook, or pretty much any coffee shop in southwestern Virginia.

Add DREAM BOY to your Goodreads shelf.

Order DREAM BOY at Indie Bound, Amazon or Barnes and Noble.

1

It’s National Poetry Month!

April is National Poetry Month! What better way to celebrate than by reading a OneFour debut book! Here’s a look at some of our books that have a special tie-in to poetry:

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tracy Holczer Secret Hum of a Daisy

THE SECRET HUM OF A DAISY

Putnam/Penguin

a middle grade novel – available May 1st

 

Twelve-year-old Grace and her mother have always been their own family, traveling from place to place like gypsies. But Grace wants to finally have a home all their own. She thinks she’s found it with Mrs. Greene and her daughter Lacey so when her mother says it’s time to move on again, Grace summons the courage to tell her mother how she really feels. She’ll always regret that her last words to her were angry ones.

Now faced with making a home with a grandmother she’s never met, and according to her mother, didn’t want her in the first place, Grace is desperate to get back to Mrs. Greene and Lacey. A mysterious treasure hunt, just like the ones her mother used to send her on, may must be the key. It all begins with a crane. And Grace is sure it’s her mother showing her the way home.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Robin HerreraHopeIs

HOPE IS A FERRIS WHEEL     

Amulet Books

a middle grade novel – available now

 

Ten-year-old Star Mackie lives in a trailer park with her flaky mom and her melancholy older sister, Winter, whom Star idolizes. Moving to a new town has made it difficult for Star to make friends, when her classmates tease her because of where she lives and because of her layered blue hair. But when Star starts a poetry club, she develops a love of Emily Dickinson and, through Dickinson’s poetry, learns some important lessons about herself and comes to terms with her hopes for the future.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Skila Brown  caminar

CAMINAR        

Candlewick Press

a novel in verse – available now

Carlos knows when the soldiers arrive with warnings about the Communist rebels, it’s time to be a man and defend the village, keep everyone safe. But Mama tells him not yet—he’s still her quiet moonfaced boy. The soldiers laugh at the villagers, and before they move on, a neighbor is found dangling from a tree, a sign on his neck: Communist.

Mama tells Carlos to run and hide, then try to find her. . . . Numb and alone, he must join a band of guerillas as they trek to the top of the mountain where Carlos’s abuela lives. Will he be in time, and brave enough, to warn them about the soldiers? What will he do then? A novel in verse inspired by actual events during Guatemala’s civil war, Caminar is the moving story of a boy who loses nearly everything before discovering who he really is.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Linda Phillips  Crazy

CRAZY

Eerdmans Books for Young Readers 

a novel in verse – available in October 2014

Fifteen-year-old Laura Walberg can’t imagine life without sketching or painting.  When her artist mother has a nervous breakdown the same week Laura’s teacher pressures her to enter a prestigious contest, Laura must face her fear that art will send her over the edge, too.

Driven by shame and rage, Laura hides her disintegrating home life from everyone, including her best friend. Neither her older sister nor her father recognizes her fear of going insane.  Desperately alone, she considers suicide, faith healing, an unlikely relationship with a super-jock, and a new artistic endeavor.  When Laura’s mother becomes violent, Laura vows to find the demon that is driving her crazy.  An amazing discovery changes Laura forever and opens her heart to the mother she never knew.

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Madeleine Kuderick   Kiss of Broken Glass
KISS OF BROKEN GLASS
Harper Teen

a YA novel – coming September 2014

 

After she’s caught in the school bathroom cutting herself with the blade from a pencil sharpener, fifteen-year-old Kenna is put under mandatory psychiatric watch, where she feels like she’s lost everything – her blade, her friends, her freedom. She has seventy-two hours to face her addiction, deal with rejection, and find an answer to the question – What do you do when nothing stops the hurt but pain? An incandescent novel that pulses with emotion and lingers long after the last page. KISS OF BROKEN GLASS is unforgettable.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you’ve read a good novel with poems lately, we’d love to hear about it in the comments. Happy Poetry Month!

Skila Brown has an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts. She grew up in Kentucky and Tennessee, lived for a bit in Guatemala, and now resides with her family in Indiana. Her debut novel, CAMINAR, is available now from Candlewick Press.
0

STOLEN SONGBIRD Release Day!!

It seemed like just yesterday that I had months and months to wait until my book hit the shelves. Which is why today I’m like this:

tumblr_m7bm5rNDob1rys4czo1_500

Thanks to everyone for helping me celebrate my book’s birthday :)

Stolen songbird actual

For five centuries, a witch’s curse has bound the trolls to their city beneath the ruins of Forsaken Mountain. Time enough for their dark and nefarious magic to fade from human memory and into myth. But a prophesy has been spoken of a union with the power to set the trolls free, and when Cécile de Troyes is kidnapped and taken beneath the mountain, she learns there is far more to the myth of the trolls than she could have imagined.

Cécile has only one thing on her mind after she is brought to Trollus: escape. Onlythe trolls are clever, fast, and inhumanly strong. She will have to bide her time, wait for the perfect opportunity.

But something unexpected happens while she’s waiting – she begins to fall for the enigmatic troll prince to whom she has been bonded and married. She begins to make friends. And she begins to see that she may be the only hope for the half-bloods – part troll, part human creatures who are slaves to the full-blooded trolls. There is a rebellion brewing. And her prince, Tristan, the future king, is its secret leader.

As Cécile becomes involved in the intricate political games of Trollus, she becomes more than a farmer’s daughter. She becomes a princess, the hope of a people, and a witch with magic powerful enough to change Trollus forever.

FIRST THREE CHAPTERS

GOODREADS

AMAZON

BARNES & NOBLE

0

Happy Book Birthday, TWELVE STEPS (by Veronica Bartles)!!

WooHoo!! The day has finally arrived! TWELVE STEPS is officially available, and I’m so excited/nervous/a little bit terrified to think that so many amazing people are now reading my words! I just want to give you all a giant squish hug!!

TWELVE STEPS by Veronica BartlesOfficial Blurb:

 Sixteen-year-old Andi is tired of being a second-class sibling to perfect sister Laina. The only thing Andi’s sure she has going for her is her awesome hair. And even that is eclipsed by Laina’s perfect everything else.

 When Andi’s crush asks her to fix him up with Laina, Andi decides enough is enough, and devises a twelve-step program to wrangle the spotlight away from Laina and get the guy. But when a stolen kiss from her crush ends in disaster, Andi realizes that her twelve-step program isn’t working. Her prince isn’t as charming as she’d hoped, and the spotlight she’s been trying to steal isn’t the one she wants.

 As Laina’s flawless façade begins to crumble, the sisters work together to find a spotlight big enough for both to shine.

 Amazon | iBooks | Kobo | Authorgraph | Goodreads

 

For the past twelve days, I’ve had tons of fun celebrating the countdown to TWELVE STEPS with giveaways, recipes and exclusive excerpts and teasers from my favorite parts of the book. I shared my official TWELVE STEPS playlist, two amazing book trailers, a first look at chapter one, a post with the inspiration for the novel, a peek at my actual high school diary, and a special thank you to my secret crush, who inspired my favorite supporting character. In case you missed the excitement, here’s a list of all twelve countdown celebration posts.

Day #12: I share my playlist with you on YA Misfits’ Band Geek Thursday

Day #11: Watch my book trailers & vote for your favorite on I Write for Apples blog

Day #10: Flash giveaway for exclusive TWELVE STEPS artwork

Day #9: Recipe for Crock Pot Giant Brownie Sundae

Day #8: Giveaway!!! Recycle-Knit Daisy Purse, Handmade by Veronica Bartles

Day #7: Exclusive reveal: A page from Veronica’s teen diary!

Day #6: Twitter giveaways

Day #5: Exclusive first look at TWELVE STEPS’ Chapter One

Day #4Giveaway!!! Ninja Unicorn “Movie Poster”

Day #3: A Thank You to those who may not know how much they helped with TWELVE STEPS – including my secret high school crush, who inspired my favorite supporting character.

Day #2: The inspiration for TWELVE STEPS

Day #1: Recipe for Crock Pot Chili Cheese Fries

And the excitement is only beginning! Today kicks off my blog tour with more exclusive excerpts, reviews, and character interviews. And of course, another giveaway! You can find all the links here!

 

Veronica Bartles lives in New Mexico with her husband and four children. When she’s not writing or lost in the pages of her newest favorite book, she enjoys creating delicious desserts, exploring new places, and recycle knitting. Her debut novel, TWELVE STEPS (Swoon Romance) will be released in March 2014.
0

Happy Release Day, Caminar!

Happy Release Day, Caminar!   caminar

What people are saying:

Exquisitely crafted poems are the basis of an unusually fine verse novel…”

–Horn Book, starred review

“…a much-needed addition to Latin American-themed middle grade fiction.”

–School Library Journal, starred review

A moving introduction to a subject seldom covered in fiction for youth…A promising debut.”     

–Kirkus

A Junior Library Guild Selection

From the jacket flap:

Carlos knows when the soldiers arrive with warnings about the Communist rebels, it’s time to be a man and defend the village, keep everyone safe. But Mama tells him not yet—he’s still her quiet moonfaced boy. The soldiers laugh at the villagers, and before they move on, a neighbor is found dangling from a tree, a sign on his neck: Communist.

Mama tells Carlos to run and hide, then try to find her. . . . Numb and alone, he must join a band of guerillas as they trek to the top of the mountain where Carlos’s abuela lives. Will he be in time, and brave enough, to warn them about the soldiers? What will he do then? A novel in verse inspired by actual events during Guatemala’s civil war, Caminar is the moving story of a boy who loses nearly everything before discovering who he really is.

Here’s where you can get your copy of Caminar:

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Indie Bound

Skila Brown has an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts. She grew up in Kentucky and Tennessee, lived for a bit in Guatemala, and now resides with her family in Indiana. Her debut novel, CAMINAR, is available now from Candlewick Press.
1

Rin Chupeco: THE GIRL FROM THE WELL

The Girl from the Well (August 5, 2014; Sourcebooks)

You may think me biased, being murdered myself. But my state of being has nothing to do with the curiosity toward my own species, if we can be called such. We do not go gentle, as your poet encourages, into that good night.

A dead girl walks the streets.

She hunts murderers. Child killers, much like the man who threw her body down a well three hundred years ago.

And when a strange boy bearing stranger tattoos moves into the neighborhood so, she discovers, does something else. And soon both will be drawn into the world of eerie doll rituals and dark Shinto exorcisms that will take them from American suburbia to the remote valleys and shrines of Aomori, Japan.

Because the boy has a terrifying secret – one that would just kill to get out.

—–

We have a lot of fantastic authors at OneFour KidLit and are excited to introduce them all to you. One author, four questions.  Today we’re talking to Rin Chupeco, author of THE GIRL FROM THE WELL.  And while not technically an undead spirit herself, Rin has been mistaken enough times as one hat she feels she can  competently write about them.

Hey, you’re getting published!  How’d that happen?

It almost didn’t. I live in the Philippines, where writing speculative fiction locally was discouraged – mostly because nobody has ever eked out a decent living from them. The chances of successfully establishing myself as an author in the international scene was even lower. For the longest time, I believed people when they said it wasn’t worth the effort, until a chance encounter with a rather famous writer (here’s a hint: his name starts with an ‘N’, and ends in an ‘eil Gaiman’) convinced me I’ll never know if I never try.

The thought of a nine to five job for the rest of my non-pensioned life finally scared the crap out of me, and I began to write. At first they were short stories, which got me into local and online indie publications, but with little financial compensation. From there I soon graduated to novels. I wrote a book, queried it for awhile, then shelved it after realizing I’d made the neophyte’s mistake of querying too soon. My experiences in an old building where I used to work, combined with an odd conversation with a friend about horror movies, inspired me to write a second book, which I did in roughly three months, falling back on my love for creepy Asian things and psychological ghost stories.

I knew this was THE ONE after I penned the final draft; I knew it was different, I knew there was nothing like it out yet, and I thought the concept was unusual enough to be noticed. Requests started coming in as soon as I started querying, and I eventually signed on with Rebecca Podos and Nicole LaBombard from the Helen Rees Agency. A few months later, I accepted a publishing deal with Sourcebooks, and have been thrilled ever since.

What’s your debut book about?  Can you share any cool details with us?

THE GIRL FROM THE WELL is based on the Bancho Sarayashiki, which is one of the most popular ghost stories in Japan. It’s about a young maidservant accused of something she didn’t do, but was thrown down a well as punishment. Now her ghost rises nightly from that well, unable to rest in peace. It’s the same story the movie Ringu / The Ring was based upon, but while the relentless Sadako is driven by hate and rage with little reason, my protagonist has something few ghosts are able to retain in the afterlife: a conscience, however slight that may be.

This doesn’t stop her from being violent when the situation calls for it, and while she considers most of what she does true justice, I wouldn’t say she’s been able to temper it with mercy when it comes to many of her victims – though she’s forced to reassess her centuries-old vengeance when innocent humans become involved. It’s a tale of redemption, a love story without necessarily being a romance – and it’s a story about how even the worst of monsters might still deserve what most people are often given: a second chance.

Are there any other ghost stories / urban legends you enjoy other than the Bancho Sarayashiki?

Right off the bat, I’m gonna say that Japan has some of the weirdest ghosts you will ever read about. One is Hanako-san, a little girl who has a predisposition for haunting toilets. She appears only after you knock at the  third stall of a school bathroom on the third floor, and ask for her by name, much like the Bloody Mary legend. Outcomes vary, from apparitions of a bloody hand, to her killing the caller rather gruesomely. Another more horrifying ghost is the Kuchisake-onna, a woman who wanders around with a mask on who stops and asks people if she’s pretty. If they say no, she kills them; if they say yes, she takes off her mask and shows them a mouth that has been slit from ear to ear, and asks them again. Another “no” gets them killed, and a “yes” will make her slash their mouths to give them the same disfigurement. Not exactly a good outcome for both answers.

Philippine mythology doesn’t get as much popularity as I think it deserves, too. There’s the legend of the manananggal, who’s usually a pretty girl in the daytime. At night, she has the ability to sever her body from the waist up, sprout wings, and fly over rooftops looking for babies and pregnant women to feast, on with a long prehensile tongue that can slip through small cracks in ceilings for this purpose. And there’s the tiyanak, which manifests as a crying baby apparently left in the woods or at an abandoned lot, and turns into basically an evil gremlin the instant you pick them up. I am a huge sucker for stories like these!

What cool facts might readers not know about you?

1. I was born and raised in the Philippines, but am ethnically Chinese for the most part. (I’m something of a mutt, with some Malay / Thai / Spanish / etc. trawling through the family bloodstream, though we’ve never been able to pinpoint a more definite ratio). This might explain why I’ve got huge eyes for an Asian, but STILL does not explain why I’ve got the body of a short thirteen year old girl while other family members are built like models.

2. I have foldable hands, in that I can fold them lengthwise, due in part to an old diving-into-a-shallow-pool-because-I’m-an-idiot incident. This gives me no superpowers whatsoever, other than the ability to gross people out.

3. I grew up on a steady diet of television and books, and Conan O’Brien was my babysitter for the latter part of my childhood. (On the other hand, Remington Steele appeared to be my favorite series during my toddlerhood. My father has stories  where, at two years old, I would point to Pierce Brosnan on-screen and yell: “That’s my boyfriend!”)

Despite an uncanny resemblance to Japanese revenants, Rin has always maintained her sense of hummus. Raised in Manila, Philippines, she keeps eight pets: a dog, six birds, and a husband. She’s been a time traveler, a Starfleet captain, and a mutant, because real jobs are overrated. Her YA horror, THE UNNATURAL STATES OF DEAD GIRLS IN WELLS (Sourcebooks), pitched as Dexter meets the Grudge, is due out Fall 2014.
1

Amy Zhang: FALLING INTO PLACE

Falling Into Place

 

 

Hey, you’re getting published! How’d that happen? (aka, what was your path to publication)
I wrote FALLING INTO PLACE during NaNoWriMo the year before last year, sort if in a fit of self-pity. My first novel had just been rejected at acquisitions, school sucked, and I was generally not in a fantastic place, emotionally. So I wrote about a girl who made a lot of mistakes and the imaginary friend who would never let her go. And I felt better.

I sent it to my agent, who was really excited about it. We revised it for about two months, and then we sent it out on subs. It sold within the week—the craziest, most mind-blowingly awesome week EVER. I hyperventilated and cried and laughed a lot. S/O to the world for not committing me to an asylum (love you, world <3).
What’s your debut book about? Can you share any cool details with us?

The GR pitch: On the day Liz Emerson tries to die, they had reviewed Newton’s laws of motion in physics class. Then, after school, she put them into practice by running her Mercedes off the road.

Why? Why did Liz Emerson decide that the world would be better off without her? Why did she give up? Vividly narrated by Liz’s imaginary friend from childhood, a friend she long ago abandoned, this heartbreaking and nonlinear novel pieces together the short and devastating life of Meridian High’s most popular junior girl. Mass, acceleration, momentum, force—Liz didn’t understand it in physics, and even as her Mercedes hurtles toward the tree, she doesn’t understand it now. How do we impact one another? How do our actions reverberate? What does it mean to be a friend? To love someone? To be a daughter? Or a mother? Is life truly more than cause and effect? Amy Zhang’s haunting and universal story will appeal to fans of Lauren Oliver, Gayle Forman, and Jay Asher

The Amy pitch: It’s about the laws of motion and Newton the Virgin and making wishes on scenic towers and being a good friend and being a bad friend. It’s about being afraid of silence and hating gravity and losing at hide-and-seek. It’s about the day you stop believing in heroes and the day you start again. And most of all it’s about being a teenager. Making mistakes. Hating school. Dating the wrong people. Cheating on tests. Forgetting your calculator. Experimenting. Regretting it. And finding the strength to move on.

What cool facts might readers not know about you?

The first book that ever made me cry was Charlotte’s Web. I sleep with a decorative dagger behind my bed because it makes me feel badass. I used to sleep with books under my pillow. I broke my typewriter and am still trying to find a place to fix it (if anyone has a local typewriter-fixer, please share). Sometimes I walk around the house and interpret Disney songs as dramatic monologues. I like ceramics. I’m super talented when it comes to marathoning TV shows. I like pumpkin frozen yogurt. I’ve been stuck on level 65 of Candy Crush for a ridiculously long time.

…I have very loose definition of “cool.”

Do you have any writing quirks–places you need to write or things you need to have with you?

Okay, don’t judge. I write best in my bathtub. I fill it with pillows and blankets and I write. It’s relaxing and the curvature of the tub totally helps the creative juices or something (actually, mostly I write there because the door locks and there are no distractions). It’s totally normal and not weird at all and it’s RELAXING, okay? Okay.